South Carolina AFL-CIO

                          

If you were not there, you missed the amazing 65th Annual Convention of the SC AFL-CIO. Phenomenal speakers, PRO-ACT rally, Election of new leaders, Awards, Scholarships awarded, and an emotional Memorial service.  Let us not forget the fun!  Great raffle prizes!

 

2020’s growth in pay inequity between workers and CEOs confirms the “executive base salary reductions” touted during the COVID-19 crisis were just lip service, per this year’s AFL-CIO Executive Pay

The South Carolina American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations says the state must take action on

John Sweeney, who led an era of transformative change in America’s labor movement, passed away Feb. 1 at the age of 86.

Recent News

In April 2020, after the labor market took its largest one-month hit in modern history, Black men and women suffered job losses proportionate to those of white women. Still, their losses were far less severe than those of Hispanic men and women. Black workers already had higher unemployment rates, as has always been the case, but their unemployment rates did not skyrocket as much as other groups.

The nation watched earlier this year as heroic warehouse workers at the Amazon facility in Bessemer, Alabama, made history.

Despite intense pressure, intimidation and bullying by one of the largest corporations in the world, they fought to reclaim their fair share of power and form a union. They spoke out about an experience familiar to so many working people—the stress of being overworked, underpaid, and afraid for the future.

This week, the AFL-CIO is leading a PRO Act Week of Action, part of the labor movement’s national campaign urging senators to pass this transformative labor law reform. This week of action includes at least one event near every U.S. senator’s office.

In April 2020, after the labor market took its largest one-month hit in modern history, Black men and women suffered job losses proportionate to those of white women. Still, their losses were far less severe than those of Hispanic men and women. Black workers already had higher unemployment rates, as has always been the case, but their unemployment rates did not skyrocket as much as other groups.

Take Action

Make a quick call to 866-202-5409 & tell your Representative to cosponsor

The PRO Act is the most significant worker empowerment legislation since the Great Depression because it will:

  • Empower workers to exercise our freedom to organize and bargain. 

  • Ensure that workers can reach a first contract quickly after a union is recognized.

  • End employers’ practice of punishing striking workers by hiring permanent replacements. Speaking up for labor rights is within every worker’s rights—and no worker should lose their job for it.

  • Hold corporations accountable by strengthening the National Labor Relations Board and allowing it to penalize employers who retaliate against collective bargaining.

  • Repeal “right to work” laws—divisive and racist laws created during the Jim Crow era—that lead to lower wages, fewer benefits and more dangerous workplaces.

  • Create pathways for workers to form unions, without fear, in newer industries like Big Tech.

Two pieces of legislation will take an important step toward fixing our unjust immigration system by providing permanent protections to vital members of our communities and our unions. Call your senators and urge them to support the Dream Act (S. 264) and the SECURE Act (S. 306) today.